written by Lee Clifford

BC singer/songwriter Billy the Kid stripped down.

Now that I’ve gotten your undivided attention, I’m going to tell you about this awesome live album from an artist with a few tracks, some nice ink, and an immeasurable amount of talent.

Front girl of pop-punk band Billy & The Lost Boys, Billy the Kid has gone on to become a staple in the Canadian Folk revival that’s been exploding in popularity in the last few years with acoustic stylings and blue collar lyrics.

The latest gift from Billy comes in the form of an eight track EP of tunes recorded live in the studio of XM radio’s indie music channel, The Verge, and as my suggestive opening line reflects, this is Billy the Kid’s folk style stripped down to just lyrics and guitar or piano, and it’s great!

The EP opens with the hard-hitting working class commentary, Catastrophe, a tune that’s relevant of today’s economy and work force sorrows; a brilliant piece of lyrical flow as, despite the depressing atmosphere of the song, one can’t help but feel a bit of a hope resurfacing in the chorus as Billy rallies us to ask “is there more than this?”

Track two is my favourite song of Billy the Kid, the in-love-not-in-love ballade I Don’t Want To Know. It’s fair to say that since this is my favourite song by Billy, this is also my favourite track on the album, hearing the raw message and emotion as the extra instruments have been stripped away.

Next up is the haunting piano ballade Alison, which is a call out to more women than we probably like to admit as sympathetic lyrics plead with a young woman to leave the abuse.

Following is one of Billy’s better known tunes, The Drugs, a plea to a friend who has turned to drug use.

Ya know, the more I listen to these songs in order, the more it begins to feel like Billy’s telling us a progressing story… I like it… it’s neat.

The remaining four tracks continue with haunting beauty and raw, unbridled emotion as Billy faces topics and issues that effect everyone, whether they be man, woman or child.

The album closes with another chilling tune titled The Way I Miss You, seeming to bring this tale to its conclusion with gorgeous melodies that inspire goosebumps.

Fans of Billy the Kid or just Canadian Folk in general need to get this EP. Eight tracks at $7.92 on iTunes, you’ll be getting more than your money’s worth; and to you new fans it is a great primer to prepare you for more of the musical serenity of Billy the Kid. Samples are up on her MySpace, but make sure to support this great Canadian artist!

I’m out

written by Lee Clifford

BC singer/songwriter Billy the Kid stripped down.

Now that I’ve gotten your undivided attention, I’m going to tell you about this awesome live album from an artist with a few tracks, some nice ink, and an immeasurable amount of talent.

Front girl of pop-punk band Billy & The Lost Boys, Billy the Kid has gone on to become a staple in the Canadian Folk revival that’s been exploding in popularity in the last few years with acoustic stylings and blue collar lyrics.

The latest gift from Billy comes in the form of an eight track EP of tunes recorded live in the studio of XM radio’s indie music channel, The Verge, and as my suggestive opening line reflects, this is Billy the Kid’s folk style stripped down to just lyrics and guitar or piano, and it’s great!

The EP opens with the hard-hitting working class commentary, Catastrophe, a tune that’s relevant of today’s economy and work force sorrows; a brilliant piece of lyrical flow as, despite the depressing atmosphere of the song, one can’t help but feel a bit of a hope resurfacing in the chorus as Billy rallies us to ask “is there more than this?”

Track two is my favourite song of Billy the Kid, the in-love-not-in-love ballade I Don’t Want To Know. It’s fair to say that since this is my favourite song by Billy, this is also my favourite track on the album, hearing the raw message and emotion as the extra instruments have been stripped away.

Next up is the haunting piano ballade Alison, which is a call out to more women than we probably like to admit as sympathetic lyrics plead with a young woman to leave the abuse.

Following is one of Billy’s better known tunes, The Drugs, a plea to a friend who has turned to drug use.

Ya know, the more I listen to these songs in order, the more it begins to feel like Billy’s telling us a progressing story… I like it… it’s neat.

The remaining four tracks continue with haunting beauty and raw, unbridled emotion as Billy faces topics and issues that effect everyone, whether they be man, woman or child.

The album closes with another chilling tune titled The Way I Miss You, seeming to bring this tale to its conclusion with gorgeous melodies that inspire goosebumps.

Fans of Billy the Kid or just Canadian Folk in general need to get this EP. Eight tracks at $7.92 on iTunes, you’ll be getting more than your money’s worth; and to you new fans it is a great primer to prepare you for more of the musical serenity of Billy the Kid. Samples are up on her MySpace, but make sure to support this great Canadian artist!

I’m out

written by Lee Clifford

BC singer/songwriter Billy the Kid stripped down.

Now that I’ve gotten your undivided attention, I’m going to tell you about this awesome live album from an artist with a few tracks, some nice ink, and an immeasurable amount of talent.

Front girl of pop-punk band Billy & The Lost Boys, Billy the Kid has gone on to become a staple in the Canadian Folk revival that’s been exploding in popularity in the last few years with acoustic stylings and blue collar lyrics.

The latest gift from Billy comes in the form of an eight track EP of tunes recorded live in the studio of XM radio’s indie music channel, The Verge, and as my suggestive opening line reflects, this is Billy the Kid’s folk style stripped down to just lyrics and guitar or piano, and it’s great!

The EP opens with the hard-hitting working class commentary, Catastrophe, a tune that’s relevant of today’s economy and work force sorrows; a brilliant piece of lyrical flow as, despite the depressing atmosphere of the song, one can’t help but feel a bit of a hope resurfacing in the chorus as Billy rallies us to ask “is there more than this?”

Track two is my favourite song of Billy the Kid, the in-love-not-in-love ballade I Don’t Want To Know. It’s fair to say that since this is my favourite song by Billy, this is also my favourite track on the album, hearing the raw message and emotion as the extra instruments have been stripped away.

Next up is the haunting piano ballade Alison, which is a call out to more women than we probably like to admit as sympathetic lyrics plead with a young woman to leave the abuse.

Following is one of Billy’s better known tunes, The Drugs, a plea to a friend who has turned to drug use.

Ya know, the more I listen to these songs in order, the more it begins to feel like Billy’s telling us a progressing story… I like it… it’s neat.

The remaining four tracks continue with haunting beauty and raw, unbridled emotion as Billy faces topics and issues that effect everyone, whether they be man, woman or child.

The album closes with another chilling tune titled The Way I Miss You, seeming to bring this tale to its conclusion with gorgeous melodies that inspire goosebumps.

Fans of Billy the Kid or just Canadian Folk in general need to get this EP. Eight tracks at $7.92 on iTunes, you’ll be getting more than your money’s worth; and to you new fans it is a great primer to prepare you for more of the musical serenity of Billy the Kid. Samples are up on her MySpace, but make sure to support this great Canadian artist!

I’m out

written by Lee Clifford

BC singer/songwriter Billy the Kid stripped down.

Now that I’ve gotten your undivided attention, I’m going to tell you about this awesome live album from an artist with a few tracks, some nice ink, and an immeasurable amount of talent.

Front girl of pop-punk band Billy & The Lost Boys, Billy the Kid has gone on to become a staple in the Canadian Folk revival that’s been exploding in popularity in the last few years with acoustic stylings and blue collar lyrics.

The latest gift from Billy comes in the form of an eight track EP of tunes recorded live in the studio of XM radio’s indie music channel, The Verge, and as my suggestive opening line reflects, this is Billy the Kid’s folk style stripped down to just lyrics and guitar or piano, and it’s great!

The EP opens with the hard-hitting working class commentary, Catastrophe, a tune that’s relevant of today’s economy and work force sorrows; a brilliant piece of lyrical flow as, despite the depressing atmosphere of the song, one can’t help but feel a bit of a hope resurfacing in the chorus as Billy rallies us to ask “is there more than this?”

Track two is my favourite song of Billy the Kid, the in-love-not-in-love ballade I Don’t Want To Know. It’s fair to say that since this is my favourite song by Billy, this is also my favourite track on the album, hearing the raw message and emotion as the extra instruments have been stripped away.

Next up is the haunting piano ballade Alison, which is a call out to more women than we probably like to admit as sympathetic lyrics plead with a young woman to leave the abuse.

Following is one of Billy’s better known tunes, The Drugs, a plea to a friend who has turned to drug use.

Ya know, the more I listen to these songs in order, the more it begins to feel like Billy’s telling us a progressing story… I like it… it’s neat.

The remaining four tracks continue with haunting beauty and raw, unbridled emotion as Billy faces topics and issues that effect everyone, whether they be man, woman or child.

The album closes with another chilling tune titled The Way I Miss You, seeming to bring this tale to its conclusion with gorgeous melodies that inspire goosebumps.

Fans of Billy the Kid or just Canadian Folk in general need to get this EP. Eight tracks at $7.92 on iTunes, you’ll be getting more than your money’s worth; and to you new fans it is a great primer to prepare you for more of the musical serenity of Billy the Kid. Samples are up on her MySpace, but make sure to support this great Canadian artist!

I’m out