Our Feature Presentation: INCEPTION

Like in Memento, where you follow the actions of Leonard trying to piece his life together, you are trying to put the clues together in your head

as well.  Or in his most recent before this, a little independent feature, not sure if you’ve heard of it, The Dark Knight, he puts ethics into your own mind while the characters on screen think of the consequences to their actions as well. This movie mixes those two premises together and makes it something of its own.

Now for the plot (semi-spoilers!), we have Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his friend Arthur (played quite well by Joseph Gordon-Levitt). They, along with an “architect”, at first Nash (played by Lukas Haas) then they get Ariadne (Canadian holme-girl Ellen Page), develop these dream states for others where they get in and try to steal important aspects of other peoples’ minds, their ideas. They are persuaded by a tycoon by the name of Saito (one of Nolan’s Batman Begins villains, Ken Watanabe) to plan out a heist, yes a heist, so elaborate that Saito wants one of his arch-rivals Robert Fischer Jr. (Cilian Murphy) develops an idea to get rid of his entire company, an idea inserted into his mind by Cobb and friends, hence the inception. For the rest of the plot, and the subplot involving Leonardo DiCaprio fighting with his own mind over his former wife (played by Marion Cotilliard), I suggest you see the movie, because this is all I am saying about it.

Cobb and Ariadne set out to capture an idea in Inception.

This movie plays out so elaborately; putting in slow motion effects, amazing feats of CGI and other graphic technology, and a hallway fight that could rival Oldboy that I cannot describe how astonished I was with how everything fell together so beautifully. Many hardcore fans won’t agree (but most other people probably will) with this statement, but I would have to say that it was definitely miles ahead of Avatar, especially with the story aspects. I have to see it again just to catch everything that occurred.

From all these positives though there are some negatives I found. Mainly with how lengthy this movie played out, my legs honestly fell asleep (but not too far that they were in the dreams within the dreams within the dreams, etc. :-P). But it is fair to say that at about 2 hours and 20 minutes it was just enough time to flesh out all the characters while putting forward the subplot that we can manipulate our dreams and live fancy free, but are we truly free? Also, they bill the movie with Michael Caine as a headliner to the likes of Leo, Marion, and Ellen, but he only gets about 4 to 5 minutes of screen time, max. Overall though, without spoiling the entirety of the plot, it is one that you have to see to believe. The action and sci-fi flow so brilliantly together that it makes you forget that it’s also a heist flick to the likes of Italian Job (another Caine picture) and Ocean‘s Eleven. Overall, I would say if you want to take a date, a friend, anyone out to see this picture, DO IT, because it will give you something to talk about, especially with the great ending.

Now that this article’s finished, I’m off to bed, good night.

8.9 out of 10

Peace!

Andrew Tomayer

by Andrew Tomayer

Inception (definition): origin, an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events. The creation of an idea.

The hallway fight that is just one of the amazing reasons to see this feature presentation

From that alone tells you nothing about this movie and how blown away I was of it. Neither was the teaser trailer that we saw a year ago. We had no idea who was specifically in it (other than Leonardo DiCaprio). We did not have any clue what it was about. All we were given were blaring bass notes played to small tidbits of scenes that seemed so fragmented, even my Grandma couldn’t put this puzzle together (and she likes a good puzzle).

Fast forward to today, all we have for the trailer are Ellen Page and Leo involved in scenes of exploding scenery to set the pace of what really was going on, dreams. The state of the subconscious where we pass out to 8 hours (sometimes more, sometimes less) each and every night, where we like to live in a world that exists only where things seem perfect but artificial.

This premise has been played before time and time again in movies and television. For example inThe Matrix (released over ten years ago if you can believe it, wow I feel old) we have Neo waking up from the dream-like state that was what he thought was the real world. Even in Mulholland Dr. the main character, played brilliantly by Naomi Watts, spends the entire tale realizing that she was in a dream in the end. There have been examples before it and after it, but I am just saying this premise has occurred many times before Inception. However, Christopher Nolan does something differently, like he does in many of his original pieces and even his Batman flicks, he makes you think….

by Andrew Tomayer

Inception (definition): origin, an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events. The creation of an idea.

The hallway fight that is just one of the amazing reasons to see this feature presentation

From that alone tells you nothing about this movie and how blown away I was of it. Neither was the teaser trailer that we saw a year ago. We had no idea who was specifically in it (other than Leonardo DiCaprio). We did not have any clue what it was about. All we were given were blaring bass notes played to small tidbits of scenes that seemed so fragmented, even my Grandma couldn’t put this puzzle together (and she likes a good puzzle).

Fast forward to today, all we have for the trailer are Ellen Page and Leo involved in scenes of exploding scenery to set the pace of what really was going on, dreams. The state of the subconscious where we pass out to 8 hours (sometimes more, sometimes less) each and every night, where we like to live in a world that exists only where things seem perfect but artificial.

This premise has been played before time and time again in movies and television. For example inThe Matrix (released over ten years ago if you can believe it, wow I feel old) we have Neo waking up from the dream-like state that was what he thought was the real world. Even in Mulholland Dr. the main character, played brilliantly by Naomi Watts, spends the entire tale realizing that she was in a dream in the end. There have been examples before it and after it, but I am just saying this premise has occurred many times before Inception. However, Christopher Nolan does something differently, like he does in many of his original pieces and even his Batman flicks, he makes you think….

by Andrew Tomayer

Inception (definition): origin, an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events. The creation of an idea.

The hallway fight that is just one of the amazing reasons to see this feature presentation

From that alone tells you nothing about this movie and how blown away I was of it. Neither was the teaser trailer that we saw a year ago. We had no idea who was specifically in it (other than Leonardo DiCaprio). We did not have any clue what it was about. All we were given were blaring bass notes played to small tidbits of scenes that seemed so fragmented, even my Grandma couldn’t put this puzzle together (and she likes a good puzzle).

Fast forward to today, all we have for the trailer are Ellen Page and Leo involved in scenes of exploding scenery to set the pace of what really was going on, dreams. The state of the subconscious where we pass out to 8 hours (sometimes more, sometimes less) each and every night, where we like to live in a world that exists only where things seem perfect but artificial.

This premise has been played before time and time again in movies and television. For example inThe Matrix (released over ten years ago if you can believe it, wow I feel old) we have Neo waking up from the dream-like state that was what he thought was the real world. Even in Mulholland Dr. the main character, played brilliantly by Naomi Watts, spends the entire tale realizing that she was in a dream in the end. There have been examples before it and after it, but I am just saying this premise has occurred many times before Inception. However, Christopher Nolan does something differently, like he does in many of his original pieces and even his Batman flicks, he makes you think….

by Andrew Tomayer

Inception (definition): origin, an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events. The creation of an idea.

The hallway fight that is just one of the amazing reasons to see this feature presentation

From that alone tells you nothing about this movie and how blown away I was of it. Neither was the teaser trailer that we saw a year ago. We had no idea who was specifically in it (other than Leonardo DiCaprio). We did not have any clue what it was about. All we were given were blaring bass notes played to small tidbits of scenes that seemed so fragmented, even my Grandma couldn’t put this puzzle together (and she likes a good puzzle).

Fast forward to today, all we have for the trailer are Ellen Page and Leo involved in scenes of exploding scenery to set the pace of what really was going on, dreams. The state of the subconscious where we pass out to 8 hours (sometimes more, sometimes less) each and every night, where we like to live in a world that exists only where things seem perfect but artificial.

This premise has been played before time and time again in movies and television. For example inThe Matrix (released over ten years ago if you can believe it, wow I feel old) we have Neo waking up from the dream-like state that was what he thought was the real world. Even in Mulholland Dr. the main character, played brilliantly by Naomi Watts, spends the entire tale realizing that she was in a dream in the end. There have been examples before it and after it, but I am just saying this premise has occurred many times before Inception. However, Christopher Nolan does something differently, like he does in many of his original pieces and even his Batman flicks, he makes you think….

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Sean Chin

Publisher & Chief Editor at Live in Limbo. Host & Producer of the Capsule Podcast. Lover of music, films and technology. Sean is a an award-winning photographer. His work has appeared on CBC, Pitchfork and MUCH. And has been involved in the Toronto music scene since 2005. You should follow him on Twitter @SeanChin.

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