MUSICMusic Reviews

Hey Rosetta! at Downsview Park – Canada Day 2011

Album: Seeds – Hey Rosetta!

mp3: Yer Spring – Seeds

mp3: Downstairs – Seeds

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

It probably isn’t in a band’s best interest to start their set with a quiet number, especially as an opening act on a massive stage in the middle of a field. Actually, let’s rephrase that. It probably isn’t in a band’s best interest to start their set with a quiet number, unless they’re Hey Rosetta! The rousing six-piece hailing from St. John’s, Newfoundland played an incredible 45 minute set layered with tracks that were born to be played live. The set was built in parallel to the opening number; a subtle start building and growing into something massive. Use of not-so-traditional rock band instruments such as the piano and cello (yes, a cello) only add to this band’s uniqueness. The crowd ate it up from start to finish clapping along at any chance they got and most likely wishing the band could have stuck around for a few more songs.

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

It probably isn’t in a band’s best interest to start their set with a quiet number, especially as an opening act on a massive stage in the middle of a field. Actually, let’s rephrase that. It probably isn’t in a band’s best interest to start their set with a quiet number, unless they’re Hey Rosetta! The rousing six-piece hailing from St. John’s, Newfoundland played an incredible 45 minute set layered with tracks that were born to be played live. The set was built in parallel to the opening number; a subtle start building and growing into something massive. Use of not-so-traditional rock band instruments such as the piano and cello (yes, a cello) only add to this band’s uniqueness. The crowd ate it up from start to finish clapping along at any chance they got and most likely wishing the band could have stuck around for a few more songs.

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

It probably isn’t in a band’s best interest to start their set with a quiet number, especially as an opening act on a massive stage in the middle of a field. Actually, let’s rephrase that. It probably isn’t in a band’s best interest to start their set with a quiet number, unless they’re Hey Rosetta! The rousing six-piece hailing from St. John’s, Newfoundland played an incredible 45 minute set layered with tracks that were born to be played live. The set was built in parallel to the opening number; a subtle start building and growing into something massive. Use of not-so-traditional rock band instruments such as the piano and cello (yes, a cello) only add to this band’s uniqueness. The crowd ate it up from start to finish clapping along at any chance they got and most likely wishing the band could have stuck around for a few more songs.

hey rosetta! concert photos toronto

It probably isn’t in a band’s best interest to start their set with a quiet number, especially as an opening act on a massive stage in the middle of a field. Actually, let’s rephrase that. It probably isn’t in a band’s best interest to start their set with a quiet number, unless they’re Hey Rosetta! The rousing six-piece hailing from St. John’s, Newfoundland played an incredible 45 minute set layered with tracks that were born to be played live. The set was built in parallel to the opening number; a subtle start building and growing into something massive. Use of not-so-traditional rock band instruments such as the piano and cello (yes, a cello) only add to this band’s uniqueness. The crowd ate it up from start to finish clapping along at any chance they got and most likely wishing the band could have stuck around for a few more songs.

About author

Chief Editor & Founder of Live in Limbo. Host & Producer of the Capsule Podcast. Sean is an award-winning photographer and Nikon Professional Services member. His work has appeared on the CBC, Pitchfork, and MUCH. He is an Academy Delegate at the JUNOs (CARAS) and has been involved in the Toronto music scene since 2005. He is also an endurance and CrossFit athlete. You should follow him on Twitter @SeanChin.